FREE SHIPPING FOR ALL ORDERS OVER $70

0

Your Bag is Empty

Are Your Muscles Guarded?

Are you someone that holds your abdomen? A butt gripper? A shoulder tenser? It is important to note when learning about muscle guarding, that overusing a muscle is just as detrimental as underusing a muscle. Muscle guarding is psychological tensing that we do automatically that can be damaging to our bodies.

Are Your Muscles Guarded?

Are you someone that holds your abdomen? A butt gripper? A shoulder tenser? It is important to note when learning about muscle guarding, that overusing a muscle is just as detrimental as underusing a muscle. Muscle guarding is psychological tensing that we do automatically that can be damaging to our bodies.

When the brain senses bony instability or tissue damage, another automatic response is made to the degree of the threat and the appropriate action our bodies’ need to take. Another term for a different type muscle guarding is “protective spasm.”
The protective spasm portion of muscle guarding is the brain’s reflex attempt to prevent further injury to soft tissues. By splinting the area with a spasm, the muscle “locks” which reduces painful joint movements. In cases of lower back pain and sciatica, these defenses can send sharp warnings to the brain when we move unexpectedly.
Some examples of muscle guarding are flexing your abdomen all day believing that is building tone, anxiety induced shoulder tensing, and constant clenching of your pelvic floor. These are all habits that are done reflexively once you train your body to do so. It becomes natural to your body, when it isn’t natural at all.

If you activate a muscle even 60% your body shuts it down. This means that if you are tensing your arm more than 60%, your body shuts down blood flow to that limb. This results in your arm not getting proper amounts of oxygen and then it can’t eliminate waste.
Over time, with continual muscle guarding, you begin to develop pain, trigger points, and decreases to the strength in the muscles you “guard.” Completely contracting and relaxing your muscles are essential to building strength.
Retraining your body to release and relax the parts of your body you hold is essential to changing muscle tensions. When a person’s body is excessively muscle guarding, they experience soreness, tenderness, and pain around the affected area as well as tension around tendons.
The most common consequence of muscle guarding is muscle fatigue, of the main tensing muscle and even those supporting this muscle that are overcompensating. Especially in patients that have sciatica, you may feel these effects due to the other parts of your body overcompensating for the pain around your sciatic nerve.
Relaxation and release are necessary to recovering and retraining the guarded muscles. Such a release can be administered through a chiropractor, massage therapy, acupuncture, or many other home states.  

When the brain senses bony instability or tissue damage, another automatic response is made to the degree of the threat and the appropriate action our bodies’ need to take. Another term for a different type muscle guarding is “protective spasm.”
The protective spasm portion of muscle guarding is the brain’s reflex attempt to prevent further injury to soft tissues. By splinting the area with a spasm, the muscle “locks” which reduces painful joint movements. In cases of lower back pain and sciatica, these defenses can send sharp warnings to the brain when we move unexpectedly.
Some examples of muscle guarding are flexing your abdomen all day believing that is building tone, anxiety induced shoulder tensing, and constant clenching of your pelvic floor. These are all habits that are done reflexively once you train your body to do so. It becomes natural to your body, when it isn’t natural at all.

If you activate a muscle even 60% your body shuts it down. This means that if you are tensing your arm more than 60%, your body shuts down blood flow to that limb. This results in your arm not getting proper amounts of oxygen and then it can’t eliminate waste.
Over time, with continual muscle guarding, you begin to develop pain, trigger points, and decreases to the strength in the muscles you “guard.” Completely contracting and relaxing your muscles are essential to building strength.
Retraining your body to release and relax the parts of your body you hold is essential to changing muscle tensions. When a person’s body is excessively muscle guarding, they experience soreness, tenderness, and pain around the affected area as well as tension around tendons.
The most common consequence of muscle guarding is muscle fatigue, of the main tensing muscle and even those supporting this muscle that are overcompensating. Especially in patients that have sciatica, you may feel these effects due to the other parts of your body overcompensating for the pain around your sciatic nerve.
Relaxation and release are necessary to recovering and retraining the guarded muscles. Such a release can be administered through a chiropractor, massage therapy, acupuncture, or many other home states. 

related posts

ZARIFA TENS Units and TENS Devices

ZARIFA TENS Units and TENS Devices

Zarifa Tens Units alleviated back and neck pain cause by various trauma and/or continual strain. TENS stands for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. When injured your body naturally protects itself with...

Zarifa and Shiatsu: What is Shiatsu Massage?

Zarifa and Shiatsu: What is Shiatsu Massage?

What is Shiatsu?Shiatsu massage is a form of therapeutic bodywork from Japan. It uses kneading, pressing, soothing, tapping, and stretching techniques and is performed without oils through light, comfortable clothing.“Shiatsu”...

Top 8 Shiatsu Chair Benefits

Top 8 Shiatsu Chair Benefits

1. Jade HeatZarifa Massage Chair nodes are patented Jade with Heating Nodes. When they light up you know they are working. The Heat is trapped in the Massage Chair comfort...

How to Heal Your Jumper's Knee (Patellar Inflammation) and Get Back on Your Feet

How to Heal Your Jumper's Knee (Patellar Inflammation) and Get Back on Your Feet

What Is the Patella? Commonly Referred to as the Knee Cap, the patella is the small bone that is in the front of the knee. Buy Now EMS/TENS What is...

OUR NEWSLETTER

Get the latest news you need, straight to your inbox.

LIVE PAIN FREE